Glossary

On the stats pages as well as the commentaries I write here and in other places, there are terms and notations I use that need additional explanations. Here is a glossary of all the statistical terms used. It will be updated as needed.

MW: Matches won

ML: Matches lost

GW: Games won

GL: Games lost

RW: Rounds won

RL: Rounds lost

50CB: Mid-round comeback wins

50CB%: Mid-round comeback win rate

25CB: Late-round comeback wins

25CB%: Late-round comeback win rate

50BL: Mid-round leads blown

50CL: Mid-round closeout rate

25BL: Late-round leads blown

25CL: Late-round closeout rate

Time: Average time per round

CPT Top 8s (or CPT T8s): Capcom Pro Tour Top 8 matches. That means the moment or stat happened within the Top 8 of a Capcom Pro Tour event.

Early round: When both players have more than 50 percent of their health remaining.

Mid-round: When at least one player has less than 50 percent health remaining but more than 25 percent health.

Late round: When at least one player has less than 25 percent health remaining.

Time: The time elapsed per round. It is not time remaining in the round unless otherwise indicated.

Mid-round comeback: When one player is sent to 50 percent health remaining in a round and trailing at the moment of the hit, but comes back to win.

Example: Daigo is sent to 50 percent health remaining in a round by Tokido, who has not gotten hit yet. Daigo ultimately wins the round. Daigo is credited with a mid-round comeback.

Late-round comeback: When one player is sent to 50 percent health remaining in a round and trailing at the moment of the hit, but comes back to win.

Example: Daigo is sent to 25 percent health remaining in a round by Tokido, who has not gotten hit yet. Daigo ultimately wins the round. Daigo is credited with a late-round comeback.

Mid-round closeout: When one player sends his/her opponent to 50 percent health remaining in a round while having the lead and ultimately wins the round.

Example: Daigo is sent to 50 percent health remaining in a round by Tokido, who has not gotten hit yet. Tokido ultimately wins the round. Tokido is credited with a mid-round closeout.

Late-round closeout: When one player sends his/her opponent to 25 percent health remaining in a round while having the lead and ultimately wins the round.

Example: Daigo is sent to 25 percent health remaining in a round by Tokido, who has not gotten hit yet. Tokido ultimately wins the round. Tokido is credited with a late-round closeout.

Note: It is possible to have a mid-round comeback and a late-round closeout.

1 percent: When one player has either 1 or 0 percent health remaining in a round and wins. The round is only logged as 1 percent health for the winner. Any comeback is defined as late-round.

Clutch situation: When both players are a less than 25 percent health in a round where one or both players are on match point.

Dominant round: A round won with the player having more than 51 percent health remaining AND finished in 20 seconds or fewer, or a perfect regardless of time.

Final four: The final four players in a tournament. Unless otherwise indicated, the final four players compete in the Losers Bracket Semifinal, Winners Bracket Final, Losers Bracket Final, the Grand Final and, if needed, the Reset Final. (Note: the Grand Final and Reset Final are charted as separate matches if a Reset Final happens in a tournament)

Characters: The database uses “Claw”, “Boxer” and “Dictator” in place of the Western-defined names for Vega, Balrog and M. Bison, respectively.

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Frequently Asked Questions

— What is considered early round, mid round and late round?

Early round is the time in the round before one player reaches 50 percent health.

Mid round is the time when one player has reached 50 percent health until one player has reached 25 percent health.

Late round is the time when one player is at 25 percent health until the round is decided by time or KO.

Time is not used as a benchmarks in determining early, mid and late round.

— But the players can trade leads before then, do you count that?

No. I only count the benchmarks. If a player has the lead at the mid round and loses it in the late round or altogether, I count that.

The premise behind some of the categories is how often players win when they have the lead at the various benchmarks.

— What if players trade and both are at 50 percent or 25 percent?

When a trade (both players get hit at the same time) puts both players at a benchmark at the same time, it is the player who has the lead at that moment that is counted in the stats. If they are still tied, it is the next player to do damage who will be counted.

Either event is a rare occurrence, taking place about one every 750 rounds played.

— I’m new here, what stat should I look for?

There will be numbers for everyone, but the first is the game history (GW, GL) and match history (MW, ML). This gives you the broad result of who has done what against players or characters.

Late round closeout (25CL) is another very important number in that it tells us how often a player wins a round when having the lead late. The higher the number, the better the player is at winning when having the lead.

— How do I read the numbers?

The numbers are read much like baseball averages. 1.000 is 100 percent, .999 is 99.9 percent, and so on.

— Why are some cells blank?

It means the player hasn’t had that certain event happen yet. Instead of a .000 in place, it is left blank.

— I have read your best of 5 stats. What’s that about?

The stats are the results when a player has taken a 2-0 or 2-1 lead. I have a list of all of the comebacks in such instances for the 2018 season which you can view here. You can view the 2017 version here.

— Is the best of 5 stat a probability?

The actual results you see continuously updated on this site are just results. The win percentage changes as more matches are played. If 7 of 10 players hold on to a 2-0 or 2-1 lead, the rate is .700. That does not mean the next player to take a 2-0 or 2-1 lead has a .700 chance to win.

Now, the probability of winning a best of 5 match when taking a 2-0 or 2-1 lead is always .813 no matter what.

— Let’s say I lead 2-0 and lose. I’m up 2-1 still, and I then win. Do you count that?

Yes but with a clarification.

The stats I gather for the 2-X rate is when someone wins their second game and has the lead. What I’m counting is what happened when you went ahead 2-0 in this match. From there it is whether you went on to win or lose the match. So, yes you are ahead 2-1 after a loss, but that match is part of the 2-0 group.

— What is the clutch stat?

The clutch stat involves certain rounds that take place in a match. Much like clutch time in other sports, the clutch stat let’s us see how well players do when the match is on the line.

The official definition: a clutch round is when both players are at less than 25 percent health and one or both players are on match point.

— How did you come up with the clutch stat?

The idea is to grab all of the match points that are close. There are plenty of match points that are not close. About 1 in every 4 match points fall into the clutch stat.

— Why not every match point?

Not every match point is close, and many of them are mop up finishes. We’re only grabbing the match points that are close.

— How do you track the stats?

I track all stats manually.

— What happens during a pause?

In most tournaments and tournament series, a pause results in a round being awarded to one of the two players. When a pause occurs, there are several checks that take place.

If there is an agreement or rule that the players continue playing, then the round continues as is, and all stats are noted as any other round.

If the pause results in an automatic win to a player, then I note the winner as any other round. The health total, comeback totals and time are based on when the players are completely done with the round.

Sometimes, the players will let the round count down because they will carry over all meter into Round 2 or 3. If so, then the round time is 99 seconds, and the health progress is whatever happened, including any adjustments made during the countdown (an example is here).

Other times, the players will go to character select after the pause and prepare for the next game if there is one (another scenario is they get forced by the game to go to character select). The time of the round and health progress is whatever it was at the pause.

— What happens if a game is reset?

If players have to start a game over, all stats of the affected game are reset.

— What happens in a double KO?

We follow the progression of the current game. All stats are as noted in the event of both players being rewarded for a win or a loss.

— What happens in a tie game?

The match continues as is unless tournament rules say otherwise. If the match continues, the game number goes to the next one despite the score, and the score is based on the official ruling of the tournament organizer or league.

Example 1: Tokido leads Daigo 1-0 in Game 2. In Round 3, the players finish with a double KO. The tournament organizers have declared no game awarded. The next game in our database is Game 3, with Tokido leading 1-0.

Example 2: Tokido leads Daigo 1-0 in Game 2. In Round 3, the players finish with a double KO. The tournament organizers have declared a game awarded to each player. The next game in our database is Game 3, with Tokido leading 2-1.

Example 3: Tokido and Daigo are tied 2-2. In Round 3, the players finish with a double KO. The tournament organizers have declared no game awarded. The next game in our database is Game 6, with both players tied 2-2.

— Is there a chance you could get a stat incorrect?

Yes, human error is possible given I track all stats manually. However, I am constantly watching the tournaments to review any possible changes to the databases. The goal is to be as accurate as possible, thus multiple viewings of matches are common.

If a change is made regarding a specific player or round, it will be noted in a changelog, which can be viewed here.

— What programs do you use to for the database?

I use Microsoft Excel 2016, PHP and MySQL.